Postcard Marketing Success Tips – Get the True Facts

If you’re a postcard marketer or looking to get started with postcard marketing this article will will either make you mad or scare you away from the postcard marketing industry. I am a successful direct mail marketer and I think it’s about time for all of the BS to come to a stop. I’m so sick of all of the lies and false promises about this form of marketing and all of the guru’s preying on the newbies just to make a quick buck.

First of all postcard marketing success is totally dependent upon your ability to stay consistent. Do not let anyone tell you that you can mail 1,000 this week, then site back and watch the money roll in. It just doesn’t work that way. To be successful you need to mail postcards on a weekly basis no matter what your results are. I’ve said it before; postcard marketing is not a quick sale process. The postcards you mail today, typically won’t yield you any results for two weeks to a month. If you don’t understand this process you will fail miserably within this industry.

Whatever product or service you’re trying to sell with your postcards, make sure that it’s a useful product or service. This is very important because it will immensely impact your sales conversions. If the product is horrible how can you expect people to buy it. I see people screw this up everyday, then they complain that direct mail marketing doesn’t work…bull crap!

I’ve been making money mailing postcards from home for the last two years. Most of the products I market revolve around making money from home. I like to stick with this niche because it has a hungry buying audience and there is never a shortage of mailing lists. This niche has been profitable for me and I encourage all new postcard marketers to start with this niche as well.

Acupuncture Marketing – What’s the Best Way to Get More Patients?

Dear Forward-Thinking Acupuncturist, what’s better than a college degree in marketing? A life degree in relationship marketing.

The reason I say relationship is because most people look at marketing as creating some sort of brand that makes people somehow want to buy your product or in this case your Acupuncture and TCM service. Branding does work but only if you’ve got deep pockets and can spend A LOT of money upfront without seeing an immediate result.

The secret weapon acupuncturists like you can use is a direct-response marketing approach in your healing business. One very important thing to remember is that when you market your services whether it’s on your website or offline, you can’t make everything about you.

It is ALWAYS about what you can do for them. You see, in the prospects eyes you being in business for 20 years really doesn’t mean anything emotionally. Now, they might say “Wow, that’s impressive” and then click the back button on the internet browser and start looking for another clinic that tells them what THEY, the prospect, will get.

People buy based on emotion. And when you inject emotional direct response marketing into your business you’ll start to notice how many more prospects actually convert into paying patients. Your acupuncture marketing should be based, like in life, on emotion. You can’t expect someone to chose you because you’ve been around for “X” amount of years.

But if you become their friend and develop a relationship, you’ll not just have a patient “getting some acupuncture” but a life-long client who ONLY wants to work with you. Not because you’re flashy but because you’re sincere and honest.

That’s how you want to run your marketing.

Book Marketing: Which Social Media Will Help to Boost Sales?

I just attended a short seminar about using social media to improve sales. While the overview was informative, it was also a bit overwhelming. Maybe my response was generational, but I’m a “seasoned citizen” and prefer to speak to people face-to-face, not electronically.

Thankfully, I have the necessary computer skills to write books, send emails, participate in blog talk radio, and post on the Internet. But in the computer age, this may not be enough.

Steve Kloyda, a “prospecting expert,” gave the seminar and his entire business hinges on maximizing social media. Phone, snail mail, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook YouTube, text messaging — Kloyda touched on them all. I’m already on Facebook and LinkedIn and stay in touch with book publishing contacts via email and phone. How could I make better use of social media?

According to Kloyda, 75 percent of all Internet activity come from smart phones. I don’t have a smart phone and am not sure I need one. However, I do have a professionally designed website and update it every few months. This website has received lots of traffic.

As the seminar came to a close, attendees were asked the action they planned to take to better use social media. I said I would update my Facebook listing. What I didn’t say, and am considering, is starting a blog again. Several years ago, I had a blog and, since it didn’t get much traffic, canceled my subscription. Though I have a Twitter account, I use the Internet to post, and my posts have been few.

Later, as we were driving home, my friend and I discussed social media and how we could use it to spark book sales. We’re co-authoring a book and, after it is published, will go in different marketing directions. She is a dietitian and will continue to network in her field. I’m a grief writer and will continue to produce articles and books in my field.

Our conclusion: We will use the social media that work for us as individuals. This brought my thoughts back to the marketing strategies I currently use: writing ezines, writing for an online grief community, writing for a magazine, speaking to support groups, and giving conference presentations. But I need to become more savvy, so I’m identifying my action steps.

Though I may not take all of these steps, at least they will get me moving forward and, hopefully, increase sales. My possible action steps include getting a smart phone, blogging regularly, adding blog talk radio programs to my website, revising my LinkedIn bio, posting on YouTube, and reading some of the books Steve Kloyda recommended during the seminar.

Are you in the dark about social media? If so, it’s time to turn on the light and take action. Your local library may offer classes or talks. Check the newspaper for similar listings. Post on Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube. Finally, make sure your brand is consistent. Upload a current photo and use key words to describe your writing niche. Good luck!

Copyright 2011 by Harriet Hodgson